Goal:

At the end of this lesson, students will have an understanding of who the Métis were in 1869 and who the Métis are today. Students will also understand why the Métis were concerned about protecting their claim to the land.

Essential Questions:

2.2: How did the fur trade, European settlement, and the rise of the Métis Nation transform life for the peoples of the Northwest?

3.3: How did Canada’s relationship with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples change after Confederation?

Historical Thinking Concepts:

2.  Use primary source evidence

3.  Identify continuity and change

4.  Analyze cause and consequence

5.  Take historical perspectives

6.  Understand the ethical dimensions of history

Activating:

At the beginning of the lesson, read with the students this article related to the 2013 Supreme Court of Canada’s decision related to Métis land claims.

You can also visit the Manitoba Metis Federation’s webpage devoted to Métis land claims.

Depending on your learning community, it might be beneficial to provide this article in advance so that students are coming prepared to discuss the issues.

Create a simple chart with the following headings:

What I Know

What I Need to Learn

Questions I Have

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have students identify issues, legislation, people, and movements from the article and place them under the headings.

Have a discussion about what information and concepts you need to collectively explore in order to understand and contribute to and/or critique this article.

Acquiring:

Now that you identified what you need to know and what questions you still have, find more sources. Your students are no doubt curious about the issues raised. It is now time to capitalize on this controversial issue.

Try to create an educative experience for your students. This might require that you contact the Manitoba Metis Federation, The Louis Riel Institute, or the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba to see if a speaker can come out and talk about Métis land claims (the Treaty Commission would offer excellent perspectives on Treaties 1 and 2).

You can also provide other text sources for your students in order for them to understand the events and movements that have led to the Supreme Court’s decision (this might also require a brief explanation of the history and role of the Supreme Court).

Other Recommended Sources:

Joseph Boyden: Louis Riel & Gabriel Dumont

Chester Brown: Louis Riel.

George Goulet: The Trial of Louis Riel.

Jean LaPrairie: Au Temps des Troubles, Louis Riel, & louis Riel: Resistance of 1885 — LaPrairie’s series can be acquired from the Louis Riel Institute.

Maggie Siggins: Riel.

You can also use the student-friendly version of Norma Hall’s historical backgrounder “A History of the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia

All of these texts are accessible for multiple learners and approach the land claim issue with different styles.

Applying:

Create a mock Supreme Court. Assign nine judges and create two teams: the appellants (those who are appealing) and the respondents (those who are responding to the appeal). The Supreme Court of Canada outlines how a mock trial might take place. Use this as a model, but substitute the criminal aspects of their case with issues in the Métis land claims case. This can be modified in numerous ways. Be sure to have your lawyers brainstorm and create arguments based on the ARE model (Argument, Rationale, and Evidence). Have them create their arguments in groups and rehearse.

Assessment:

Students should have a basic understanding of the land claims case and have used this knowledge to create their own arguments and their own analysis of history, using evidence. Have them respond to this article or a current article that deals with Métis land claims. This might be a direct comment on a newspaper’s website, a letter to the editor, or an article for the school’s paper.

Have students identify issues, legislation, people, and movements from the article and place them under the headings.

Have a discussion about what information and concepts you need to collectively explore in order to understand and contribute to and/or critique this article.

Acquiring:

Now that you identified what you need to know and what questions you still have, find more sources. Your students are no doubt curious about the issues raised. It is now time to capitalize on this controversial issue.

Try to create an educative experience for your students. This might require that you contact the Manitoba Metis Federation, The Louis Riel Institute, or the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba to see if a speaker can come out and talk about Métis land claims (Treaty Commission would offer excellent perspectives on Treaties 1 and 2).

You can also provide other text sources for your students in order for them to understand the events and movements which have led to the Supreme Court’s decision (This might also require a brief explanation of the history and role of the Supreme Court).

Other Recommended Sources:

Chester Brown: Louis Riel

Joseph Boyden: Louis Riel & Gabriel Dumont

Maggie Siggin: Riel

Jean LaPrairie: Au Temps des Troubles, Louis Riel, & louis Riel: Resistance of 1885 (LaPrairie’s series can be acquired from the (Louis Riel Institute)

George Goulet: The Trial of Louis Riel

You can also use the student-friendly version of Norma Hall’s historical backgrounder located at the beginning of this guide.

All of these texts are accessible for multiple learners and approach the land claim issue with different styles.

Applying:

Create a mock Supreme Court. Assign nine judges and create two teams - the appellants (those who are appealing) and the respondents (those who are responding to the appeal). The Supreme Court of Canada outlines how a mock trial might take place. Use this as a model, but substitute the criminal aspects of their case with issues in the case. This can be modified in numerous ways. Be sure to have your lawyers brain storm and create arguments based on the ARE model (Argument, Rationale, and Evidence). Have them create their arguments in groups and rehearse.

Assessment:

Students should have a basic understanding and have used this knowledge to create their own arguments and their own analysis of history using evidence. Have them respond to this article or a current article that deals with Métis land claims. This might be a direct comment on a newspaper’s website, a letter to the editor, or an article for the school’s paper.